Community Greens

People of all colors discussing evergreen ideas.

Dirty Dozen vs Clean Fifteen

chef 2

These days everyone urges you eat more fruit and vegetables to improve your health and well-being but if you don’t want to consume a chemical cocktail of at least 47 different additives, memorize and try to avoid the items below if they are non-organic:

The “Dirty Dozen”
Celery
Peaches
Strawberries
Apples
Domestic blueberries
Nectarines
Sweet Bell peppers
Spinach, kale, collard greens
Cherries
Potatoes
Imported grapes
Lettuce

You’ll be safer buying these fruits and vegetables even if they are non-organic:

“The Clean Fifteen”
Onions
Avocados
Sweet corn
Pineapples
Mango
Sweet peas
Asparagus
Kiwi fruit
Cabbage
Eggplant
Cantaloupe
Watermelon
Grapefruit
Sweet potatoes
Sweet onions

Always wash fruits and vegetables but understand washing will reduce the amount of pesticides that may remain, not eliminate them.

If it not on the list, a helpful rule of thumb may be buy produce that has thicker skin. When pealed it will have provided a better layer of protection.

Advertisements

Filed under: CGCooks, CGGrows, Community Green, Cooking, Food, Health, Healthy Eating, ,

Tomato Diaries-Baking Soda

tomato 2Home grown tomatoes are sweeter than those you buy in stores. Even the vine ripened ones can’t compare to the sweetness of tomatoes you grow yourself. To get the sweetest tomatoes each year use baking soda.

Sprinkle less than 1/4 cup per plant on the soil around your tomato plants. Don’t get the soda on the plant itself.  Sprinkle the baking soda on the soil when the tomatoes are about 1 inch in diameter and then again when they are about half grown. Or you can use 1 tsp in a gallon of water and water the plants.

The baking soda lowers the acidity levels in the soil. This will make your tomatoes more sweet than tart.  Test one plant before you try it on all your tomatoes. Be careful with young tomato plants. Have you tested your soil this year? If your soil is already alkaline, you could alter it too much by adding too much baking soda.

Use can also use baking soda to make an organic spray to treat tomato fungal disease. Combine 1 gallon of water with 1 tbsp of baking soda and 2 1/2 tbsp of vegetable oil in a spray bottle. Stir and add 1/2 tsp of Dawn or castile soap.  Spray the solution on the foliage of the plants until the fungal disease disappears.

You can also sweeten canned tomatoes when making sauce without adding sugar.

Tomato Diaries-Baking Soda

Filed under: Bissel Gardens, CGGrows, Community Gardens, Community Green, , , , , ,

15 Shade Tolerant Vegetables

Make the most of your shady garden space with these 15 shade tolerant vegetables. All they require is four hours of sunlight a day, or even less!
43-shade-tolerant-vegetables

Filed under: CGGrows, Community Gardens, Food, Gardening, ,

Tomato Pruning

The Tomato Diaries

tomato-pruning-how-to
Most plants will require some pruning during the growing season. A plant that’s pruned of excess growth is more likely to direct its energies to producing flowers and fruit more quickly, and the results will usually be larger than otherwise. Furthermore, the leaves of a pruned and supported plant dry faster, so they’re less susceptible to pathogens like bacteria and fungus. The leaves also tend to be denser, which protect fruit more effectively. This is especially true for tomatoes.

Prune only when the foliage is dry; that is, avoid pruning early in the morning when plants have dew, or after rainfall. In particular, check for discolored and damaged or diseased stems and leaves; prune out the unhealthy growth, and tend to any pests you discover immediately. Always prune flush with the stem, if possible. For tomatoes, look for the stems that grow between the main stem and another branch. These are “suckers” and should be removed. Support your tomatoes. They will benefit from it and you will get more tomatoes if you keep them off the ground. Also, clip the lower stems as they likely won’t produce fruit and, if there is any, it will be more susceptible to fungus and bacteria from dirt splashed up when you water. If you want to limit the height of the plant, pinch back the top as it reaches the desired height.

Ms. Pepper

Filed under: Bissel Gardens, CGGrows, Community Gardens, Community Green, Gardening, , , , ,

Cucumbers

cucumbers

Filed under: Bissel Gardens, CGGrows, Community Green, Gardening

About Community Greens

It takes more than a village to raise a child in today's world. The world is more than flat or round or sun and moon. It's also the village on the other side of the river. The objects in the sky are different from that view. Community Greens, griot-like, tells a story. I invite you to share my view.

CGFROG

Chuck Vasser

Blacks In Green

There are more of us people of color out there than you realize and we are coming together to express our concerns, ideas and sit at the table!

Bisselsign
Bronx River Sankofa
Smiling Bellies

Community Greens Urban Farm

Veterans Garden Food GiveawayOctober 20th, 2018
Free Greens. First Come. First Serve!

Upcoming Events

  • MLK Day of Service at Seton Falls Park January 21, 2019 at 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Seton Falls Park, at the intersection of Crawford Avenue and Palmer Avenue
  • Green Worker Co-ops: Special Co-op Academy Graduation, Bronx 1/31/19 January 31, 2019 at 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm The Point CDC - 940 Garrison Avenue - Theater - Bronx, NY 10474 For details, link here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/green-worker-co-ops-special-co-op-academy-graduation-bronx-13119-tickets-54656768867
  • Bissel Gardeners Meeting February 2, 2019 at 10:00 am – 11:00 am Veterans Garden-Propagation
  • Volunteer @ Bissel Gardens February 9, 2019 at 10:00 am – 1:00 pm Veterans Garden-Propagation
  • Crazy for Composting February 16, 2019 at 10:00 am – 3:00 pm New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd, Bronx, NY 10458, USA Saturday, February 16; 10 a.m.–12 p.m. and 1–3 p.m.
  • 25th Annual Bronx Parks Speak Up February 23, 2019 at 11:00 am – 5:00 pm Bronx Speak Up Bronx Coalition for Parks and Green Spaces

The CG Fit Chick

Cog Blogging

Bronx Fixed is Back! - BxFxd

Community Greens Consulting

Green Tips!

Bee proactive!

A few things you can do to help keep bees healthy:

  • plant different flowers that bloom throughout the season for the bees;

    • native plants and other perennials

    • bloom colors of yellow, white,  blue, and purple

  • watch for neonicotinoid-free note on plant tags- some tags will claim that insecticides were used for ‘your plant’s health’ (but NOT for the bees!)

  • leave the blossoms until they expire

  • plant plants with fragrant flowers with a long bloom season

  • consider early blooming plants for bees that have had little nourishment over the winter

Green Tips

Email

czvasser@yahoo.com

Get Community Greens.

“Even though this planet is round, there are just too many spots where you can find yourself hanging onto the edge, unless there’s some space, some place to take a breather for a while.” –Gloria Naylor

GentriGhetto

The Future of Spofford

Community Greens Photos

Chuck Vasser on Docs.com

NYBasketball

NYCPSAL Rule of the Week

NYCPSAL Rule of the Week

NYCPSAL Rule of the Week: Undershirts are not like tights. They must be a solid color similar to the jersey’s neutral zone. The sleeves must be the same length and unaltered.

NYBasketball

Fried Chicken & Philosophy

cl_butterfly_12

The Butterfly Project