Community Greens

People of all colors discussing evergreen ideas.

Planting Chart

Some vegetables are easier to get started than others. Make your gardening life just a little simpler by using the Planting Chart below:
planting-chart.png

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Filed under: Bissel Gardens, Community Gardens, Community Green, Gardening, ,

Learning To Grow At Bissel Gardens

The Oldest Community Garden in the North Bronx
by Genesis MD & Taja D.  May 2018

Starting Seeds
The Earth is ripe after all of this rain and I am told that this is the best time to grow. As I become more interested in the weeds and trees that grow in the city it is impossible to ignore the amount of weeds that have quadrupled in volume and size over these days of sky tears.  Today we were given a lesson on Starting Seeds by Delores Bryant aka the lovely “Ms. Pepper”.

Preparation
Seeds can be planted into the soil directly or they can be started in seedling trays. We used a 1 to 1 blend of compost and vermiculite as potting soil.  Vermiculite is used to soak up and store water. After mixing the two together in a wheelbarrow, we filled 6 seeding trays.

Organizing & Planting
Once the trays were filled, we needed to choose seeds, make labels, and decide where best to store the trays for maximum growth. Once these things were established, the planting began. Using a stick tip to create a furrow for the seeds, we successfully planted and labeled 6 seeds trays with cabbage, other green leaf vegetables, perennial herbs, and melons.

Personal Goals & Developments: Planting Potatoes
After doing research on growing potatoes, Chuck and I concluded that using a large construction bag was the best growing method. So we layered wood chips for drainage, weed cloth, soil and compost to create a bed for the potatoes. Per the instructions, I planted each potato seedling one foot apart approximately 6 inches (half a trowel) deep.

Stay tuned for more ‘tater growth.

Prodigy Corner
I have been learning so much about planting and what the Earth can do for us. This learning experience has been incredibly fruitful. I’ve learned a lot about plants that have incredible uses and I look forward to my future gardening experiences at Bissel Gardens.

We will be sharing our journey as we learn, plant and help to complete other projects in the near future, so follow our gardening progress at the Bissel Veterans Learning Garden in the North Bronx.

To volunteer or visit contact Chuck Vasser

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Check us out on Facebook: The Prodigy House Project – New York

Bissel Gardens Day 2 Seeding May 18 Original PDF

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Tomato Diaries-Baking Soda

tomato 2Home grown tomatoes are sweeter than those you buy in stores. Even the vine ripened ones can’t compare to the sweetness of tomatoes you grow yourself. To get the sweetest tomatoes each year use baking soda.

Sprinkle less than 1/4 cup per plant on the soil around your tomato plants. Don’t get the soda on the plant itself.  Sprinkle the baking soda on the soil when the tomatoes are about 1 inch in diameter and then again when they are about half grown. Or you can use 1 tsp in a gallon of water and water the plants.

The baking soda lowers the acidity levels in the soil. This will make your tomatoes more sweet than tart.  Test one plant before you try it on all your tomatoes. Be careful with young tomato plants. Have you tested your soil this year? If your soil is already alkaline, you could alter it too much by adding too much baking soda.

Use can also use baking soda to make an organic spray to treat tomato fungal disease. Combine 1 gallon of water with 1 tbsp of baking soda and 2 1/2 tbsp of vegetable oil in a spray bottle. Stir and add 1/2 tsp of Dawn or castile soap.  Spray the solution on the foliage of the plants until the fungal disease disappears.

You can also sweeten canned tomatoes when making sauce without adding sugar.

Tomato Diaries-Baking Soda

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Tomato Pruning

The Tomato Diaries

tomato-pruning-how-to
Most plants will require some pruning during the growing season. A plant that’s pruned of excess growth is more likely to direct its energies to producing flowers and fruit more quickly, and the results will usually be larger than otherwise. Furthermore, the leaves of a pruned and supported plant dry faster, so they’re less susceptible to pathogens like bacteria and fungus. The leaves also tend to be denser, which protect fruit more effectively. This is especially true for tomatoes.

Prune only when the foliage is dry; that is, avoid pruning early in the morning when plants have dew, or after rainfall. In particular, check for discolored and damaged or diseased stems and leaves; prune out the unhealthy growth, and tend to any pests you discover immediately. Always prune flush with the stem, if possible. For tomatoes, look for the stems that grow between the main stem and another branch. These are “suckers” and should be removed. Support your tomatoes. They will benefit from it and you will get more tomatoes if you keep them off the ground. Also, clip the lower stems as they likely won’t produce fruit and, if there is any, it will be more susceptible to fungus and bacteria from dirt splashed up when you water. If you want to limit the height of the plant, pinch back the top as it reaches the desired height.

Ms. Pepper

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Bissel Gardens Spring Prep

Community Gardening at it finest. Okay, okay, maybe not the finest but pretty darn good!

Original Post: Community Green Photo

DSC_0197 - Copy

Filed under: Bissel Gardens, Community Gardens, Community Green, Food, Gardening, ,

About Community Greens

It takes more than a village to raise a child in today's world. The world is more than flat or round or sun and moon. It's also the village on the other side of the river. The objects in the sky are different from that view. Community Greens, griot-like, tells a story. I invite you to share my view.

CGFROG

Chuck Vasser

Blacks In Green

There are more of us people of color out there than you realize and we are coming together to express our concerns, ideas and sit at the table!

Bisselsign
Bronx River Sankofa

Morgan Powell

Smiling Bellies
The First Day of SpringMarch 20th, 2018
What are you planting today?

Upcoming Events

  • Bissel Gardeners Meeting July 7, 2018 at 10:00 am – 11:00 am Veterans Garden-Propagation
  • Volunteer @ Bissel Gardens July 14, 2018 at 10:00 am – 1:00 pm Veterans Garden-Propagation
  • Bombazo Dance Co / The Sabrosura Effect July 27, 2018 at 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm St. Ann’s Ave. & 146th St., Bronx, 11413

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Community Consulting

A green roof is partially or completely covered with vegetation, such as sedum, planted in a growing medium over a waterproof membrane. Green roofs are can help insulate your house, reduce water runoff, filter pollutants, and cool the air. The typical green roof isn’t meant to be walked on. A roof garden, whether or not it has flowerbeds, is meant to be visited and enjoy.

Green Tips

Email

czvasser@yahoo.com

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The Black Caucus of IAABO. originated at the Fall Convention of IAABO that took place in Atlanta, Ga in 1987. In Jimm Paull’s (Bd #42), room in the Colony Square Hotel were Buddy Keaton, and Ken Jordan (Bd #37) from New York City. .

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